Stretchable,color changing wires

Scientists at Duke Chemistry, NC State Engineering and the University of California – San Diego have teamed up to create stretchable, flexible wires that conduct current and change colors to indicate they’re about to reach the breaking point. Future uses could be wearable electronics, biomedical devices and soft robots.

https://www.wearabletechnologyinsights.com/articles/15289/stretchy-wires-for-the-future

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Apparel that offers On-the-go Smartphone Charging

8K, an industry leader in heated apparel has officially launched the latest collection of its revolutionary outerwear. The newest offering for women and men builds on the brands expertise in creating versatile, heated outerwear, now delivering the ability to charge smartphones on the go while simultaneously delivering essential warmth in seconds.

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/8k-redefines-heat-on-demand-apparel-with-next-generation-outerwear-that-offers-on-the-go-smartphone-charging-860343031.html

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A Wearable Computer More Powerful than Glass

The company, Meta, is building computerized headwear that can overlay interactive 3-D content onto the real world. While the device is bulky, Meta hopes to eventually slim it down into a sleek, light pair of normal-looking glasses that could be used in all kinds of virtual activities, from gaming to product design. The company, which was founded by Meron Gribetz and Ben Sand, counts Mann as its chief scientist. One of Mann’s graduate students, Ray Lo, serves as chief technical officer. The company just completed a stint with Y Combinator, the successful startup accelerator based in Mountain View, California.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/518596/a-wearable-computer-more-powerful-than-glass-and-even-more-awkward/

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Mobility Lab to Assess Balance and Gait with Synchronized Body-worn Sensors

Reliable, sensitive, and clinically meaningful measures of balance and gait are critical for clinical assessment, as well as for studies of rehabilitation intervention, of patients with neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), multiple sclerosis, stroke, and other conditions such as frailty and orthopedic disorders that lead to high fall risk []. In these patients, restoration of function may require a prolonged course of therapy that can be difficult to design because progress based on small improvements are difficult to clinically measure. Technology that quantifies balance and gait more sensitively and objectively than current clinical examinations could be very useful for rehabilitation.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4062543/

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Unmade-Curated customization

A software that can create customized designs on clothing and also size them according to the person’s gait.With unmade customization editor,consumers see exactly what they are going to get .Before it is made.

https://www.unmade.com/

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Ultrathin Solar Cells

It is a thinnest, lightest solar power cell. That can be used to convert light into electric city and which can be incoporated in watches instead of using replacement batteries.Also these cells can be intergrated in fabrics and sunglasses to extract and charge the mobile phone.

https://www.livescience.com/54192-ultrathin-lightweight-solar-cells.html

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NFC payment

NFC-based card transactions brings in a new set of payment security issues

The Reserve Bank of India’s initiative to allow tap and pay transactions without the need for additional-factor authentication might help banks create an experience similar to Apple Pay in the months to come. But security vulnerabilities will remain a concern, say cyber experts.

Such transactions are processed using near field communication (NFC) technology which allows wireless communication between the card and the reader. NFC generally works within 4 cm of the reader and doesn’t require the cardholder to take out the card from his wallet: the wallet can be held over the terminal to process the transaction. Apple Pay is a mobile payment and digital wallet service using the NFC technology. It allows users make payments using the iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus and Apple Watch-compatible devices.

https://tech.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/technology/nfc-card-transaction-security-issues/46658176

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REY – Seeing beyond vision loss ( through bone conduction

REY includes a depth sensor and camera in front, capturing the user’s view and translating visual inputs to hearable inputs. The user is thereby enabled to read text, recognize colors, people and facial expressions as well as to gain a better understanding of his surrounding through descriptions. The two integrated bone conduction speakers let the user hear REY’s voice without sealing off his ears, which is an important aspect of safety. The speakers are capable of producing 3D sound which alongside the two vibration motors makes navigating instructions much more intuitive and less distracting. Furthermore, the 3D sound makes it possible for users with visual impairments to localize objects around them, which facilitates a lot of tasks. Besides the features that specifically support users with visual impairments, REY also makes it easier to perform smartphone-based tasks on the go, which makes a connected life easier for everybody

https://www.jamesdysonaward.org/en-US/2018/project/rey-seeing-beyond-vision-loss/

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Solar powered flexible heart rate monitor

Scientists have developed a human-friendly, ultra-flexible organic sensor powered by sunlight, which acts as a self-powered heart monitor. Previously, they developed a flexible photovoltaic cell that could be incorporated into textiles. In this study, they directly integrated a sensory device, called an organic electrochemical transistor—a type of electronic device that can be used to measure a variety of biological functions—into a flexible organic solar cell. Using it, they were then able to measure the heartbeats of rats and humans under bright light conditions.

https://www.medgadget.com/2018/10/stick-on-solar-powered-heart-monitor-fits-on-a-finger.html

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Wearable – Paper based UV sensor

Researchers led by RMIT University has developed paper-based UV sensors that could help people manage vitamin absorption and avoid sun damage. While humans do need some sun exposure to maintain healthy levels of vitamin D, excessive exposure can cause sunburn, skin cancer, blindness, skin wrinkling and premature signs of aging. One can print the ink on any paper-like surface to produce cheap wearable sensors in the form of wrist-bands, head bands or stickers for example.

https://www.rmit.edu.au/news/all-news/2018/sep/wearable-uv-sensors

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